Concerns raised pets are being traumatised by bangs and explosions

Vets at the UK’s leading provider of pet emergency care are calling for councils to consider using quiet fireworks at public displays.

Cities around the world have banned the use of noisy pyrotechnics amid concerns pets are being traumatised by the bangs and explosions.

Now small animal emergency specialists Vets Now are urging councils across the UK to consider following their example.

An image of someone holding fireworks close to a dog.
It’s estimated 46% of dogs and 45% of cats are scared of noisy fireworks.

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Amanda Boag, Vets Now’s clinical director, said she would welcome the use of silent or almost silent fireworks at bonfire night celebrations.

She said: “Fireworks now go off throughout the autumn and winter and this causes many pets and their owners a lot of distress. At these times we often see pets who have been burnt by fireworks or involved in road traffic accidents after being spooked and running onto the road.

“We know some councils have considered using silent fireworks and this is something we would strongly support across the country as it seems to represent a good compromise.”

It’s estimated 46% of dogs and 45% of cats are scared of noisy fireworks.

Dogs will typically show fear by trembling, panting or drooling while some will hide, bark or jump on beds when they normally wouldn’t do so.

Cats might try to run away, cower behind furniture or they may even soil the house.

Ms Boag added: “As a result of their growing popularity, fireworks are now routinely sold in shops throughout autumn.

“We would advise that you keep your pets indoors if you know a fireworks display is going to be held in your local area.”

Tired labrador lying in bed.
Many fireworks manufacturers now produce quiet fireworks.

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In 2015, councillors in Collecchio, near Parma, passed a law banning the use of noisy fireworks due to their effects on the local pet population.

Disneyland Paris also agreed to use them following complaints from residents.

Many fireworks manufacturers now produce quiet fireworks and they insist they are just as visually impressive as their noisy equivalents.

Last year, a petition to restrict the sale of fireworks to reduce stress and fear in pets was signed by more than 100,000 people.