Don't let your cat get dehydrated on warm days

During the summer months, cats are just as at risk of dehydration and hyperthermia as the rest of us. These are serious conditions that could lead to serious illness and even death. Here are some steps you can take to keep your cat hydrated and cool in the heat.

Make sure your cat has plenty of water

It’s common sense but you should check your cat’s water bowl regularly and fill it up whenever it’s low. Cats can’t survive for long without it.

Ensure there’s a shaded spot in your garden

If you have an outdoor cat and there are no naturally occurring shady spots in your garden, create one by placing some cloth or cardboard over an area to keep the sun out. Also, make sure you check outdoor buildings like sheds and greenhouses before shutting them as cats often get locked in accidentally overnight.

Brush your cat daily

Matted hair traps heat so give them a daily groom if possible. This is especially important for long-haired cats.

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Cats should have access to fresh, clean water throughout the day

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Use damp towels to cool down your cat

The warmest part of a cat’s body is their tummies, the pads of their paws, their armpits, under their chin and on the outside of their ears. Although most cats hate getting wet, try dampening a cloth with cold water and gently stroking your cat with it from their head and down their back.

Keep your cat calm

A very active cat that is running around on a hot day will quickly become exhausted and dehydrated. Encourage your cat to relax when outside temperatures are soaring.

Create a retreat

Cats are clever when it comes to comfort and they will seek out places such as the bath or sink as these often stay cool even when it’s hot outside. You could also try creating a cool and darkened indoor retreat for them to sleep in and feel safe. A top tip is to place a cardboard box on its side and position it somewhere cool and quiet in the house, such as behind a chair or on a cool surface like a wooden floor. Line it with a breathable natural fabric such as a cotton towel.

Keep outdoors cats indoors

If temperatures really soar, then it’s worth considering keeping your cat inside during the hottest hours of the day.

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During the heat of summer, cats are just as at risk of dehydration as the rest of us.

Hyperthermia and heat stroke in cats

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Encourage cool play

Ice cubes are a great way for cats to play and keep cool at the same time. Put a few on the floor so they can chase them as they scatter around the floor. Perhaps even consider flavouring the ice with a hint of chicken stock to encourage their interest.

Close the curtains

Things that keep you cool will also benefit your cat — keeping curtains or blinds closed will keep the sun out.

Watch out for signs of heat stroke

Although this generally only occurs on really hot days, it’s worth being aware of. Symptoms of heat stroke can include agitation, stretching out and panting heavily, extreme distress, skin hot to the touch, glazed eyes, vomiting and drooling. If you’re at all worried about your cat, contact your vet immediately.

Circulate cool air

Open the windows, turn on a box fan or keep air conditioning at a reasonable temperature. Your cat will appreciate having a cool place to relax indoors if it’s scorching outside.